Fulham: Three players to watch

Adrian Clarke looks at three players who will be influential in Fulham’s return to the Premier League.

Tom Cairney

Scoring the winner in the Championship play-off final was a fitting way for Tom Cairney to finish his best season to date.

Cairney has reached new levels under the guidance of Slavisa Jokanovic.

The former Hull City and Blackburn Rovers player has a wonderful left foot and makes Fulham tick.

The 27-year-old was second for chances created by Fulham players last term. Only Stefan Johansen, who takes most of their set-pieces, had more.

The 72 key passes he made also ranked him 11th in the Championship.

Cairney has a keen eye for both goals and assists, producing six and five respectively in 201718.

He combines well with Kevin McDonald and Johansen in midfield and was the Championship’s most dominant and effective passer.

No one else came close to the 3,001 passes he made.

He has the quality and style to thrive in the Premier League, situs judi bola with a team perfectly suited for him. We should expect big things from Cairney.

Cairney passing in 201718* Total Championship rank Total passes 3,001 1 Passes90 88.2 1 Pass accuracy 91.5% 1

*minimum 1,000 minutes played

Tim Ream

The United States defender has just been named Fulham’s player of the season; and rightly so. He was one of the unsung heroes of their promotion campaign.

The 30-year-old was the cornerstone of a back four who conceded only 46 goals in the regular 46-match campaign.

That was an improvement of the 57 conceded in 201617, and 79 the season before that.

Ream’s averages of 6.1 clearances and 0.7 blocks per match are the highest of all Fulham players. But his exceptional ball-playing skills also marked him out from the rest.

He is Fulham’s most comfortable defender in possession and is suited to the way head coach Jokanovic likes his team to pass out from the back.

Championship defenders in 201718 Best pass accuracy Most passes per match Conor Coady 90.3% Willy Boly 61.2 Tim Ream 88.3% Paul McShane 60.5 James Chester 87% Tim Ream 59.5

That ability to look after possession with assurance will be vital for Fulham in the Premier League.

The player signed from Bolton Wanderers is also a good reader of the game and seems to be improving with age.

Ryan Sessegnon

The Championship Player of the Year looks set to continue his rapid development with Fulham in the Premier League.

Sessegnon can play as a left-back, left wing-back, wide left-sided forward or as a striker. So is a manager’s dream.

Most of the 18-year-old’s best performances have come as a winger in a three-man forward line.

New Jersey Just Legalized Sports Betting

On Monday, New Jersey became the latest state to allow sports betting.

Gov. Phil Murphy signed a bill into law that allows licensed casinos and racetracks to take bets and run pools in designated areas.

This comes after the Supreme Court struck down a federal law in May that effectively banned sports betting in most of the country.

That case stemmed from New Jersey, so it’s no big surprise that the state’s lawmakers didn’t waste much time changing the state’s law. agen sbobet And the Garden State is home to Atlantic City, which is chock full of casinos that will soon be able to take sports bets.

Casinos and racetracks will have to apply for a waiver to start taking bets. The governor’s office estimates the state could make $13 million in taxes from the first year of sports betting.

Trending stories at Newsym

The bill was passed by the legislature Thursday, but Murphy did not sign it immediately, and the state Racing Commission sent a letter to some racetracks warning them not to begin taking bets until he did so. The delay created uncertainty about when wagering would begin, and Murphy signed the bill Monday with little advance warning.

In the meantime, criticism of Murphy mounted. His delay in signing “will go down in history as one of the most bungled state policies anywhere, anytime!” Sen. Declan O’Scanlon R., Monmouth wrote on .

The New Jersey Racing Commission will meet to discuss regulations Wednesday, then create regulations that Murphy must ratify, according to the governor’s statement. After that, racetracks and casinos will be able to secure the waiver needed to begin betting.

Online sports betting cannot begin until 30 days after the bill was signed. Any racetrack or casino that is licensed can operate sports wagering, with one exception — if an owner also has a 10 percent or greater share in a sports team, the wagering lounge cannot take bets on any team in the league. This will likely affect the Golden Nugget Casino, whose owner, Tilman Fertitta, bought the Houston Rockets for $2.2 billion last year, and thus would be unable to offer bets on the NBA at the Golden Nugget. The bill also has a carve-out for the former Garden State Park racetrack in Cherry Hill that would allow the owners of the site to open a sports-betting parlor.

Without the federal ban in place, any state can vote to legalize sports betting. Pennsylvania has legalized the practice and is working to draft regulations that must be in place before books can open. License applications are currently open for casinos. Other states are also working on it, including New York, Mississippi, and West Virginia.

Staff writer Andrew Seidman contributed to this article.

 

Murphy signs sports-betting bill into law

Gov. Murphy on Monday signed into law the state’s sports-betting bill, ending a short delay that drew criticism from many state politicians and making history after the state’s six-year battle to legalize sports wagering.

Murphy expects to place the ceremonial first bet at Monmouth Park Racetrack on Thursday morning, his office said.

“Today, we’re finally making the dream of legalized sports betting a reality for New Jersey,” Murphy said in a statement. “This is the right move for New Jersey, and it will strengthen our economy.”

The law makes New Jersey the second state, after Delaware, to legalize sports betting since the Supreme Court ruled three weeks ago to strike down the federal ban on sports gambling. It is the culmination of New Jersey’s protracted  fight to legalize sports betting, which saw the state go up against the NCAA and professional sports leagues.

For proponents, agen piala dunia it offers hope for bringing renewed life to casinos and racetracks with the opportunity to tap into a multibillion-dollar market. New Jerseyans will be able to bet legally at sports-wagering lounges on most professional and collegiate sporting events.

Monmouth Park has been ready to start betting for weeks, investing more than $1 million in outfitting the first floor with a sports-betting lounge. Other racetracks are primed to open their books across the state, and Atlantic City officials have lauded the extra revenue it is expected to bring in at casinos.

“We can now capitalize on the opportunities we worked for with a new sector of sports gaming that will help create jobs, generate economic activity, and be an important boost to the state’s casinos and racetracks,” said Senate President Stephen Sweeney D., Gloucester. “We will see sports betting get up and running, and we intend to see that New Jersey continues to be a leader with a sports gaming industry that thrives. Our efforts will pay off.”

Other legislators said the law would help horse breeders, farms, casinos, and racetracks by bringing new participants to gambling and generating revenue for the state’s general fund, casino fund, and Atlantic City marketing program.

“This will help make our casinos and racetracks more attractive gaming destinations, provide much-needed revenue to support the state budget, provide additional funding for valuable social programs, and cut down on illegal sport gaming activity,” said Assembly Speaker Craig J. Coughlin D., Middlesex.

Sports gambling may not be as lucrative as some hope. The state estimates it will bring in about $17 million in the first full year, not a large sum within a $37 billion state budget. Casinos and racetracks will pay an 8.5 percent tax for in-person betting and 13 percent for online betting, with an additional 1.25 percent on electronic bets for racetrack operators.

Sports betting bill written to include site that won’t host horse racing

Sports betting is only now set to become a reality, after the U.S. Supreme Court last month sided with New Jersey and overturned the federal ban on sports betting. | Matt SlocumAP Photo

06112018 01:37 PM EDT

Updated 06112018 04:20 PM EDT

2018-06-11T04:20-0400

Legislation Gov. Phil Murphy signed into law Monday afternoon to allow sports betting in New Jersey includes a provision for a sports book at the site of a former racetrack in Cherry Hill where there are no plans to ever host horse racing again.

The site is owned by Jack Morris and Joseph Marino, two developers with ties to South Jersey power broker George Norcross.

Story Continued Below

Most traces of the former track at what’s now Towne Place at Garden State Park, a high-end commercial and residential development, have been obliterated, except for the entrance gate at the intersection of Route 70 and Garden State Boulevard.

In 2011, New Jersey voters approved sports betting at the sites of current and “former“ horse racing tracks and casinos, but the definition of a former racetrack was not taken up until the Legislature passed a bill to implement the voters’ will.

The first attempt to enact a law to legalize sports betting in New Jersey, which was signed by then-Gov. Chris Christie in January 2012, poker indonesia was overturned in federal court. That law defined eligible sites for sports betting as simply casinos and “any former racetrack.“

In 2014, Phil Norcross, the brother of George Norcross, helped draft language for a new law to repeal the sports betting ban, according to a source with knowledge of the negotiations. The language would allow the site of the former Garden State Park Racetrack in Cherry Hill, which closed in 2001, to host sports betting.

That law, which was signed by Christie, would allow sports betting at any place “where a horse race meeting with parimutuel wagering is conducted and includes any former racetrack where such a meeting was conducted within 15 years prior to the effective date of this act.”

The 15-year time frame swept in the Cherry Hill site as well as the former Atlantic City Race Course, which closed in 2015, but left out any other horse racetracks in the state that closed decades earlier.

Despite the 2014 law, New Jersey’s legal battle to overturn the federal sports betting ban would last years longer. Sports betting is only now set to become a reality, after the U.S. Supreme Court last month sided with New Jersey and overturned the federal ban on sports betting that was enacted in 1992 and sponsored by then-New Jersey Democratic Sen. Bill Bradley.

The state Legislature on Thursday passed and sent to Murphy a bill to regulate and tax sports betting at casinos and racetracks. The legislation includes the 15-year provision. Murphy signed the bill on Monday and the first bets could be taken by the end of the week

New Jersey sports betting to begin Thursday after governor signs legislation.

The wait is over — New Jersey sports betting begins Thursday.

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy signed legislation Monday allowing the state’s racetracks and casinos to begin offering sports betting later in the week.

“Today, we’re finally making the dream of legalized sports betting a reality for New Jersey,” Murphy said in a statement Monday afternoon. “I’m thrilled to sign Assembly Bill 4111 because it means that our casinos in Atlantic City and our racetracks throughout our state can attract new business and new fans, boosting their own long-term financial prospects. This is the right move for New Jersey and it will strengthen our economy.”

Betting will begin at 10:30 a.m. Thursday at New Jersey racetrack Monmouth Park.

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy says he’s excited the “dream of legalized sports betting” is finally a reality. AP PhotoJulio Cortez

“I look forward to the governor joining us at Monmouth Park Racetrack on Thursday morning to usher in a new era for New Jersey by placing the first bet,” said Dennis Drazin, chairman and CEO of Darby Development LLC, operators of Monmouth Park.

Retired state Sen. Ray Lesniak, who spearheaded the state’s fight for legal sports betting, also hopes to be at the front of the line to place an early bet.

“Fifty dollars on France to win the World Cup,” Lesniak said. “That’s big-time for me.” The World Cup kicks off Thursday.

New Jersey is slated to open for business nearly a month after the United States Supreme Court struck down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992, the federal ban on state-sponsored sports betting.

New Jersey will be the second state, joining Delaware, poker domino to offer legal sports betting since the landmark Supreme Court ruling. Nevada had been the only state allowed to offer a full menu of sports bets for the last 26 years.

“We led the fight for sports betting and it is now happening,” New Jersey Senate President Steve Sweeney said in a statement. “We will see sports betting get up and running and we intend to see that New Jersey continues to be a leader with a sports gaming industry that thrives. Our efforts will pay off.”

Atlantic City’s nine casinos, the state’s three racetracks and sites of former racetracks may offer sports betting under the legislation. MGM Resorts, which will operate the sportsbook at the Borgata in Atlantic City, said it is “moving ahead with all possible speed to begin accepting legal sports bets as soon as required regulatory approvals are in place.”

New Jersey governor signs bill allowing sports betting

By WAYNE RRY | The

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. AP — Gamblers in New Jersey will be able to start betting on sports by Thursday under legislation the governor signed Monday legalizing a pastime that has long lived in the shadows of organized crime and shady offshore operators.

Gov. Phil Murphy, a Democrat, signed the bill just three weeks after the state won a U.S. Supreme Court victory paving the way for all 50 states to allow sports gambling. The new law allows licensed casinos and racetracks to offer sports betting in a taxed, regulated setting. The bill unanimously passed the state Legislature last week.

Start your day with the news you need from the Bay Area and beyond. Sign up for our new Morning Report weekday newsletter.

Monmouth Park, a horse track near the Jersey shore that has been preparing for this day for more than a year, said it would start taking bets Thursday morning, with Murphy making the first one, though it wasn’t certain it would be first out of the gate.

The Borgata, Atlantic City’s top casino, said it is “moving ahead with all possible speed” to start sports wagering but could not immediately say when it might take its first bet. Most other Atlantic City casinos, along with Freehold Raceway, also plan to offer sports betting but have not laid out a timetable to begin.

The Golden Nugget, daftar poker which won’t be able to take bets on pro basketball because its owner also owns the NBA’s Houston Rockets, said it would begin taking bets on other sports by the time football season begins in September, as did the Meadowlands Racetrack in East Rutherford, near New York City.

Online wagering on sports won’t take effect for another month, but gamblers able to place a bet in person can line up to place bets on the opening matches of World Cup soccer, the U.S. Open golf tournament or a variety of Major League Baseball games.

“Our casinos in Atlantic City and our racetracks throughout our state can attract new business and new fans, boosting their own long-term financial prospects,” Murphy said. “This is the right move for New Jersey and it will strengthen our economy.”

Dennis Drazin, chairman and CEO of Darby Development, which operates Monmouth Park, called it “a great day for New Jersey.”

“After a thorough review of the legislation, Governor Murphy has taken decisive and swift action in the best interests of New Jersey’s economy and sports fans across our state,” he said. “I look forward to the governor joining us at Monmouth Park Racetrack on Thursday morning to usher in a new era for New Jersey by placing the first bet.”

Murphy’s office would not predict which team the governor would choose for his first wager.

He signed the new law four days after the Democrat-led Legislature sent it to him, making New Jersey the second state after Delaware to allow sports wagering since the Supreme Court decision that cleared the way for such gambling.

“We led the fight for sports betting, and it is now happening,” state Senate President Steve Sweeney said. “We can now capitalize on the opportunities we worked for with a new sector of sports gaming that will help create jobs, generate economic activity and be an important boost to the state’s casinos and racetracks.”

The law is seen as a modest help to Atlantic City’s seven casinos, which recently have regained their footing after five others closed down since 2014. But two of those are due to reopen later this month.

The tracks, in particular, are desperate for the new revenue stream that sports betting will generate; they have been prohibited from offering slot machines like so-called “racinos” in other states.

writer Michael Catalini in Trenton, New Jersey, contributed to this report.

New Jersey legalizes sports betting

The state that sparked the legalization of betting in all American states will start accepting bets later this week.

Via the New York Times, New Jersey governor Phil Murphy signed on Monday a bill that legalizes sports wagering in the state whose lawsuit to overturn the federal ban made it to the Supreme Court. The betting will commence on Thursday.

“Today, we’re finally making the dream of legalized sports betting a reality for New Jersey,” Murphy said in a statement, per the Times. “It means that our casinos in Atlantic City and our racetracks throughout our state can attract new business and new fans, boosting their own long-term financial prospects. This is the right move for New Jersey and it will strengthen our economy.”

The real question is if when betting will be available through mobile devices, situs judi online allowing wagers to be placed by people who haven’t left their homes. Eventually, bets will surely be placed during Jets and Giants games at MetLife Stadium, on a variety of specific propositions like the outcome of a given play or a given drive.

“We have more than one teller,” Drazin noted.

Lesniak, the Union County Democrat who spent years leading New Jersey’s fight for sports betting, said he was “relieved” by Monday’s news.

His first bet? “France to win the World Cup,” Lesniak said.

Under the law, you cannot bet on high school sports, on college events taking place in the state, or any event involving a New Jersey college team anywhere.

The Borgata, Atlantic City’s top casino, also has a sports betting parlor ready to go. But while officials there said they’re “moving ahead with all possible speed” to open, they could not immediately say when that would happen.

Both the city’s Golden Nugget casino and Meadowlands Racetrack in East Rutherford said they should have betting up and running by the start of football season in September.

Atlantic City’s other six casinos and the state’s other racetrack, Freehold Raceway, are also expected to eventually have sports wagering. The law also allows former tracks — in Atlantic City and Cherry Hill — to accept bets.

But none of those facilities have timetables yet.

For Atlantic City, the wagering is expected to give a new reasons for tourists to trek to the seaside gambling resort, which had been on the brink of bankruptcy in recent years because of casinos popping up in neighboring states.

For racetracks, it could mean even more. Drazin said sports betting represents “survival” for Monmouth Park and other tracks in New Jersey, which do not feature casinos like other states.

“This means our whole future,” Drazin said.

It will also help the state budget.

Americans already spend billions of dollars placing sports bets through illegal bookies each year. But by legalizing it, officials say, the state can siphon off those dollars and bring the industry above ground.

Phil Murphy signs N.J. sports betting law. You can start betting on Thursday.

Get ready to place your bets, New Jersey. For real this time.

Gov. Phil Murphy on Monday signed a law that finally authorizes legal sports betting in New Jersey, ending a nearly decade-long saga that included a multimillion court battle against the nation’s top sports leagues and a landmark ruling from the nation’s highest court.

Monmouth Park racetrack in Oceanport is planning to become the first parlor in the Garden State to accept bets on professional and college sports games, starting Thursday at 10:30 a.m.

That’s just in time for the start of the World Cup, which begins the same day.

“Today, we’re finally making the dream of legalized sports betting a reality for New Jersey,” Murphy said in a statement Monday after signing the law, which lays out how the state will regulate and tax the betting.

The governor said the move will “attract new business and new fans, boosting their own long-term financial prospects.”

“This is the right move for New Jersey and it will strengthen our economy,” Murphy added.

The law A4111 allows people age 21 and over to bet both over the internet and in person at New Jersey’s casinos, racetracks and former racetracks.

But online betting isn’t permitted to begin for 30 days, and not every casino or track is ready to start accepting wagers.

The move is expected to bolster the state’s struggling casino and horse-racing industries and allow the state to reap millions annually in new tax revenue, situs judi bola by tapping into what has long been a billion-dollar, but predominantly illegal, market.

Murphy’s signing comes a month after the U.S. Supreme Court gave New Jersey a victory in its seven-year quest to legalize sports betting — a case that cost the state $9 million in taxpayer money. The court overturned a 1992 federal ban on such wagering, allowing states across the country to permit it.

A quick tutorial on sports betting

New Jersey will become the second state outside of Nevada to authorize sports betting. Delaware beat the state by about a week.

Until the Supreme Court’s ruling, Nevada — home to Las Vegas — was the only state in the nation with full-scale legal sports wagering.

“It’s history in the making,” state Assemblyman Ralph Caputo, D-Essex, one of the sponsors of New Jersey’s law, said Monday. “This is one of those moments when you’re pleased you serve as an elected official. This is in an instance where you provide something that’s good for the public, that’s good for the citizens, that cleans up an industry that needs to be changed, and hopefully helps New Jersey’s economy.”

Betting can’t begin right away because there’s still one hurdle left. The New Jersey Racing Commission — which will grant sports betting licenses to tracks — is scheduled to meet Wednesday to review emergency regulations. After that, Murphy must ratify the decision and tracks can apply for a temporary waiver to begin accepting bets.

New Jersey governor’s signature paves way for sports betting

Reuters – New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy on Monday signed a bill to legalize sports betting, opening the door for the state to begin regulating and taxing the activity at casinos and racetracks.

FILE PHOTO: New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy speaks after taking the oath of office in Trenton, New Jersey, U.S., January 16, 2018. REUTERSLucas JacksonFile Photo

“Our casinos in Atlantic City and our racetracks throughout our state can attract new business and new fans, boosting their own long-term financial prospects,” Murphy said in a statement. “This is the right move for New Jersey and it will strengthen our economy.”

Monmouth Park Racetrack, where the U.S. unit of U.K.-based William Hill PLC has already built a sports book, expects to take its first bet at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, a park spokesman told Reuters.

State gaming and racing regulators, agen sbobet which are scheduled to meet this week, still have to issue emergency regulations to cover the roll out at facilities that already have sports betting licenses.

Murphy’s signature positions New Jersey to be the second U.S. state to potentially roll out full-scale sports wagering, after Delaware last week.

Some states are rushing to implement sports betting in the wake of a U.S. Supreme Court decision in May that overturned a 1992 law banning it in all but a few places, including Delaware which had only allowed limited wagers.

Gross sports betting revenues at New Jersey’s casinos and horse racetracks will be taxed at 8.5 percent. After 30 days, the state will allow online bets as well, which will be taxed at 13 percent.

People placing bets must be at least 21 years old. Athletes, coaches, referees and other people with influence over games or access to confidential information are not allowed to bet on their own league’s sport.

Betting is also prohibited on high school and college games taking place in New Jersey or involving the state’s own such teams.

Professional sports leagues, most of which fought states’ efforts to legalize sports betting for years, say the New Jersey bill does not contain any of the fraud fighting provisions they need to protect the integrity of games.

Reporting by Hilary Russ in New York; Editing by Sandra Maler and Cynthia Osterman.

Assemblyman Joe Lentol D-Brooklyn said he is inclined to support the bill but wants more information on the way it would allow horse racetracks and OTBs to offer sports betting without violating the state constitution’s general prohibition on gambling.

“I’m not sure I understand how it’s constitutional yet — someone has to explain it to me,” he said. But, he added, “I think it should be made more widely to people who can run parlors.”

Assemblyman John McDonald D-Cohoes said he was in favor while Assemblyman Dick Gottfried D-Manhattan said he’s “not there yet,” and others, like Assemblyman Kevin Cahill D-Kingston, said they are willing to put aside their personal distaste for gambling if they believe there’s enough consumer protections in place.

Sports betting legislation splits Assembly Democrats

Some are taking issue with specific parts of the legislation, such as the portion of gross sports wagering revenue that would be directed to the sports leagues whose games are the object of the bets. | Ethan Miller Images

ALBANY — Assembly Democrats have splintered over sports betting with just six days remaining on the legislative schedule. That raises the possibility that nothing will get done this year, even as neighboring New Jersey moves ahead and may implement sports betting as early as this week.

“I’m not sure at this late date in the session there’s going to be enough time to move it through the process,” said Assemblywoman Addie Jenne D-Theresa. “It’s something that deserves discussion, but I’m not certain it’s going to be able to move.”

Story Continued Below

POLITICO interviewed more than a dozen lawmakers about the proposed legislation on Monday, and members expressed an array of opinions, agen piala dunia varying from outright support to broad skepticism. A handful declined to comment at all, an indication of just how contentious the issue remains in Albany.

Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie has said he personally does not like gambling but would defer to the prevailing sentiment of his Democratic conference. During his tenure as speaker, Heastie has brought legislation to the floor only if it can garner the 76 votes required for passage without needing Republican support.

Assemblywoman Crystal Peoples-Stokes D-Buffalo on Monday echoed a similarly ambivalent position.

“Personally, I don’t think it’s necessary, but if people think it’s something important to the constituents in their district and they want to put it on the floor, I’ll certainly give it all consideration,” she said.

The bill, NY A11144 17R, by Racing and Wagering Committee Chairman Gary Pretlow D-Mount Vernon, was formally introduced on Friday and has not been discussed in the internal Democratic conference meeting where Assembly leaders form their floor agenda.

Last-minute deals are commonplace on high-profile legislation, however, and none of the lawmakers interviewed would declare the heavily lobbied issue dead for the year.

“There’s plenty of time,” said Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz D-Bronx, who generally opposes gambling expansion but said he has not made up his mind on the bill. “I’m having an open mind, but I think it’s unfortunate that there will be more gambling than less gambling.”

Assemblyman David Weprin D-Queens said he fully supported Pretlow’s effort and is adding his name as a co-sponsor of the bill.

“People have been betting illegally on games and have been since time immemorial, and there’s no reason why we shouldn’t been benefiting from legalized and regulated sports betting in New York state,” he said.

Assemblyman Joe Lentol D-Brooklyn said he is inclined to support the bill but wants more information on the way it would allow horse racetracks and OTBs to offer sports betting without violating the state constitution’s general prohibition on gambling.